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RBM Partnership multimedia resources: Audio

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  • PSA 2006
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1.07.2014
USA TODAY supplement on "Innovations in Global Health" Malaria: The Silent Killer
[Interview]

25.04.2014
The Lancet Global Health Blog: Managing malaria in times of change
[Blog post]

25.04.2014
RFi "Afrique Économie": Le paludisme, un fléau pour l'économie africaine
[Audio]

25.04.2014
Media Planet (distributed with The Independent): Managing malaria in changing times
Opinion by Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré, Executive Director of Roll Back Malaria Partnership

Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré25.04.2014
Les Echos: Malaria : notre objectif pour 2015 reste de ramener à zéro le nombre de décès
Interview [en français]

Winter 2014
Global Health and Diplomacy Stretching The Dollar For Global Health: Maximizing [Audio]

8.04.2014
RFi: "Priorité santé" L'implication des entreprises dans la lutte contre le paludisme
[Audio]

30.10.2013
Journaldumali.com: Un vaccin contre le paludisme dans trois ou quatre ans
[Article]

30.10.2013
Channel Africa Radio Interview: During the 6th MIM Pan-African Malaria Conference in Durban, South Africa, Dr Nafo-Traoré speaks about what’s being done to prevent and treat malaria on an African level.
[Audio]

24.10.2013
Jakarta Globe For Moral and Economic Reasons, Malaria Fight Needs OIC Support
[Article]

Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré4.10.2013
International Innovation – Research Media Ltd:What’s being done to prevent and treat malaria on an international level
[Interview]

15.07.2013
Libération La santé en Afrique : un secteur à fort retour sur investissement
[Round Table Discussion]

29.04.2013
Les Nouvelles de l'ONU Journée Internationale de lutte contre le paludisme
[Interview]

Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré17.05.2013
Guardian Professional: 'Passion is absolutely critical if you want to be a good leader'
Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré, executive director of Roll Back Malaria talks about her career and calls for a rights-based approach to development
[Transcript]

4.05.2013
PANA (via AfriqueJet): Distribution des moustiquaires imprégnées en Afrique
[Transcript]

25.04.2013
Huffington Post: Paludisme: une vue d'ensemble
[Blog post]

23.04.2013
Huffington Post: Malaria: The Bigger Picture
[Blog post]

10.11.2012
Europe1: Les carnets du monde Les enjeux de la lutte contre le paludisme en Asie du sud-est
[Audio and transcript] 29:30- 35:50

Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré02.11.2012
UN Radio : Malaria Progress report
[Video] 00:39

30.10.2012
ABC Radio Australia : Fears about drug-resistant Malaria
[Audio]

30.10.2012
Journaldumali.com : Un vaccin contre le paludisme dans trois ou quatre ans
[Article]

29.10.2012
ABC Radio Australia : Drug resistant malaria in Africa
[Audio]

23.10.2012
Mali santé : Interview telephonique
[Transcript]

Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré15.10.2012
RFi: RBM EXD Interview to RFi Dr Nafo-Traoré
[Part 1]
[Part 2]

28.09.2012
UN Radio: Lutte contre le paludisme: les priorités de Nafo-Traoré
[Transcript and audio]

13.06.2012
The Eagle Online: Malaria deaths in Africa reduced to one-third from 2000 figure
[Article]

05.09.2012
BBC: Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré, RBM Executive Director, Guest of BBC Focus on Africa
[audio: MP3, courtesy of BBC]

19.07.2012
RBM: Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré Takes Office as RBM Executive Director
[in English] [in French]

RCM Africa: (Vol.1, Issue 1 July 2012 - September 2012 Editorial) A chat with Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré [in English] (RCM Africa is a newsletter of the Regional Coordination Mechanism of United Nations support to the African Union and its NEPAD Programme)

 

A series of public service announcements on malaria for broadcast in Africa, produced by Sumitomo in collaboration with Roll Back Malaria Partnership and the Global Fund feature Africa's finest players. These announcements are free of charge for radio and TV broadcast in Africa in the following languages - French, English, Fante, Ingala, and Yoruba.
Listen/download audio (in .wav format) by clicking on links below.

English

ODEMWINGIE & ORUMA: Malaria is the leading cause of death among young children

ODEMWINGIE: Malaria is the leading cause of death among young children
Always sleep under a longlasting insecticide treated mosquito net

ORUMA: Malaria is the leading cause of death among young children

OBAFEMI MARTINS: Malaria kills one child every 30 seconds, about 3000 every day

JOHN MENSAH: Malaria kills more than one million people each year

KOLO TOURE: Every 30 seconds malaria kills a child in Africa
Malaria is one of the primary causes of poverty in Africa

LOMANA TRESOR LUALUA: Malaria kills 3000 children every day
Always sleep under a long lasting insecticide treated mosquito net

French

DIDIER DROGBA: Chaque jour le paludisme tue 3000 enfants
Il faut toujours dormir sous une moustiquaire imprégnée de longue durée

Le paludisme est une des causes principales de la pauvreté en Afrique

PASCAL FEINDOUNO: Le paludisme est le premier tueur d'enfants en Afrique

JEAN-PAUL ABALO: Le paludisme est le premier tueur d'enfants en Afrique

ISMAEL BENGOURA: Le paludisme tue plus d'un million de personnes par an

KABA DIAWARA: Le paludisme menace plus de 40% de la population mondiale

Fan

YAO KAKA AZIAWONOU: Le paludisme est le premier tueur d'enfants en Afrique
Malaria is one of the primary causes of poverty in Africa

Youruba

OBAFEMI MARTINS: Malaria kills one child every 30 seconds, about 3000 every day

Lingala

LOMANA TRESOR LUALUA: Chaque jour le paludisme tue 3000 enfants

Real Player required: (Download player)

English French Lingala

Dikembe Mutombo, UNDP Youth Emissary:

Copyright Dikembe Mutombo Foundation"It is estimated that malaria kills up to 2.7 million persons each year; 90% of these deaths occur in Africa affecting children under the age of five years. Malaria is also the number one disease in my homeland, the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In September 2000, I contracted malaria when I visited the Congo on a goodwill mission. I know from personal experience how devastating malaria can be, but I was treated when I returned to the United States. Malaria is treatable, but not for most Africans. Malaria is a disease of poverty too and until a vaccine is developed we know that widespread use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets is the most practical, cost effective way of reducing child mortality and maternal malaria. I am happy to assist the Roll Back Malaria campaign because we will be more effective in tackling malaria as a global community rather than as a set of individual nations. I am pleased that governments from Africa and from around the world are working together on this problem".

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

Malaria is responsible for a quarter of all young child deaths in Africa, and every year the number of African children who die from malaria increases. But most of these deaths could be easily prevented. Insecticide-treated bed-nets drive away the mosquitoes carrying malaria. A treated bed-net could save your children's lives. April 25th is Africa Malaria day. Last year many African governments pledged to make insecticide-treated bed-nets cheaper by eliminating taxes and import duties. So far, only a few have actually done so. Treated Bed-nets could cost less than the equivalent of 5 US dollars each. A small amount of money to save lives. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

Malaria kills a child every 30 seconds. By the time you have heard this broadcast, another child will have died. 700,000 young African children die every year from malaria. An insecticide-treated bed-net, which costs less than the equivalent of five US dollars in some countries, could have saved many of them. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are easy to use and a most effective protection against mosquitoes carrying malaria. April 25th is Africa Malaria Day. Join the fight against malaria, and protect your family with an insecticide-treated bed-net. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

Malaria kills over 1 million Africans every year. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito which usually bites late at night. The most effective way to prevent malaria is to sleep under an insecticide-treated bed-net. The insecticide now available and recommended for treating nets is safe. The net creates a barrier and the insecticide drives away the mosquitoes and prevents them from biting. Bed-nets are simple to use, and have been shown in some areas to reduce the number of young child deaths by half. An insecticide-treated bed-net could save the life of your child. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

April 25th is Africa Malaria day. One million Africans die from malaria every year. Women and children are particularly vulnerable. But you can protect your family from malaria with insecticide-treated bed-nets. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are simple and safe to use. The insecticide repels the mosquito which transmits malaria through its bite. Insecticide-treated nets are a simple and low-cost way of preventing malaria. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

Malaria kills one million Africans every year. It hits agricultural productivity, keeps societies poor and undermines national development. But use of insecticide-treated bed-nets can dramatically reduce the impact of malaria. The insecticide drives away the mosquitoes. Insecticide-treated bed-nets can reduce the number of young children dying from malaria by half. Insecticide-treated bed-nets save lives. Tax-free bed-nets could cost less than the equivalent of five US dollars each. Protection from malaria is a right. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

One in four of all young children who die in Africa, die of malaria. That's 700,000 African children every year. That's 700,000 unnecessary deaths because malaria is preventable. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are one of the best ways to prevent malaria. The insecticide drives away the mosquito which spreads malaria. April 25th is Africa Malaria Day. The Governments of many African countries have agreed to cut taxes and import duties on bed-nets and insecticides to help make them more affordable. Children have a right to be protected from malaria. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

700,000 African children under five are killed by malaria every year. Malaria kills a child every thirty seconds - that's the time it takes you to hear this broadcast. Malaria also makes children vulnerable to other diseases. But malaria can be prevented. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are a safe and simple way of protecting your child. With insecticide-treated bed-nets, you can help to roll back malaria. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

700,000 young African children die each year from malaria. But malaria is preventable. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are simple to use, safe, and the best means of protection. In sub-Saharan Africa, it's estimated that children from 60 million families are at serious risk from malaria. But only 2 million of these families so far use bed-nets.. Every child has a right to be protected from malaria. Is your child protected? This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

Malaria kills one million Africans every year. Most of these deaths are among children under five. Adults lose many days of work every year through sickness. Malaria kills, and costs money through lost work and through the costs of drugs and treatment. But malaria is preventable. Insecticide-treated bed-nets are one of the best means of protection. Many African Governments have pledged to reduce taxes and duties on bed nets and the insecticide used to treat them in order to make them more affordable. This makes good sense because treated bed-nets mean less malaria, less sickness - so fewer days off work and better economic productivity. Tax-free bed-nets could cost less than the equivalent of five US dollars each. Their regular use will save both lives and money. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.

 

English French Portuguese Swahili Amharic

April 25th is Africa Malaria Day. 700,000 young African children die each year from malaria, but malaria can be prevented. A bednet helps protect your family from mosquito bites but to make it much more effective you need to treat your net with a special kind of insecticide which is now available in many countries. This special insecticide for treating nets is safe for your family and forms an invisible barrier which drives mosquitoes away. Insecticide-treated bed-nets save lives. This announcement was brought to you by Roll Back Malaria and the World Health Organisation.